There has been a long-standing argument between private school and public school supporters over which is more beneficial to not only the education of a child, but to their development as well.

Many of the public school supporters refuse to acknowledge the benefits of a private school education because they simply don’t know how a private school curriculum is different than that of a public school.

But, private schools can be very beneficial for providing students with a more rounded and creative educational experience. The following outlines how a private school education differs from that of a public school as well as how a private school curriculum can be more beneficial.

How are Private Schools Different?

First of all, let’s get rid of the misconception that private schools are only for the rich. Yes, they do require tuition payments, but those payments go towards providing students with a more well-rounded education. Additionally, private schools generally offer payment plans, tuition loan programs and even scholarships to help families offset the costs.

What will you get out of a private school education in return for your hard earned money?

The biggest difference is that a private school curriculum is set by the individual school charter instead of the state. Public schools have to abide by strict state educational guidelines. These guidelines do help ensure that students get the basic education they need, but they can also be severely limiting. The following are some examples of how a private school curriculum can differ when not limited by state guidelines:

Private schools have a broader curriculum

Public schools are forced to limit their curriculum because of state guidelines. Every student has to take certain classes, including specific Math, English and Science classes, leaving little room for other educational possibilities, such as classes revolving around the arts.

Although most public schools have art and music programs, they are woefully underfunded and therefore extremely limited. In fact, some public schools can only offer such courses once a week. Not to mention that public schools are not allowed to teach religious-based courses.

Most private schools will also offer more options in terms of the curriculum because they are not as limited by their budget or by state guidelines. This broader curriculum not only gives students more options, it allows them to take subjects they are actually interested in, thereby fostering their enjoyment of learning.

Private schools cater more to the individual

In public schools, everything is based on averages. The success of a school is based on average test scores, average grades, average graduation rates and more. To get to these high averages, public school teachers must focus on certain subjects where students have the most difficulties, often neglecting other subjects – including art and music courses.

This can lead to students who perform well being somewhat overlooked since teachers must focus on helping struggling students to boost their grades. At private schools, the curriculum is more focused on the individual student because they aren’t hindered by averages.

Private schools can use newer teaching techniques

Due to public school limitations in terms of their curriculum and in terms of how students are graded, public school teachers are basically forced to stick to one style of teaching. Private schools have much more flexibility, which means they can implement newer teaching techniques that can have a great impact on students.

For example, instead of the lectures that most teachers are forced to fly through in public schools, private schools often focus on a more conversational teaching technique. The conversational approach to teaching has been proven to engage students more effectively, thereby helping them to improve their communication and decision making skills in addition to absorbing the actual lessons.

To learn more about the benefits of private school, schedule a tour at Brook Road Academy today.

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